Global Warming

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al
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Global Warming

Post by al » Wed Oct 05, 2005 5:20 pm

...so here it is, Oct. 5 and it is still in the low 80s here in NE Ohio. A normal temp for this time of year would be 65 degrees F. This has been one hell of a hot summer. The end of May began the warm up and it was unually hot, without a break all summer. There were a few days in the low 70s a couple weeks ago but then it warmed up again. Even the nights have been warm this week (in October?) and I've had the windows open all night.

Finally there is supposed to be a cool down this weekend, but this can't be right. There are 88 Counties in Ohio and 72 were declared a disaster last month by our Governor due to lack of rain this summer.

So how unually warm has it been where you live?

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Post by Froggy » Thu Oct 06, 2005 8:22 am

Welll this is my first year in Germany since I was about 6 so to me Im freezing most of the time, if the temp drops below 75 then Im cold....but I guess aftr being in S.CA for so long especialy the last 5 years in the desert were the avarage temp from March to November is minimum 85 with about 6 months inbetween at about 100+.....maybe Im not the right one to comment on this :lol:

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Post by jam » Thu Oct 06, 2005 12:26 pm

Just so all of us Europeans know what's going on here:

- Celcius = (Fahrenheit - 32) / 1.8

- so e.g. 100°F = (100 - 32) / 1.8 = 38°C (more or less)

Aside from that I don't believe in any significant global warming within a human lifetime. We tend to think the winters were harder and there was so much more snow back in "the good old days". I think that is just a romantic notion stemming from the fact that we tend to forget that we were smaller (and cars were bigger!) when we were kids. Haven't you ever gone back to a place that you knew as a kid and wondered about that hill not really being so steep...? Or met somebody that you knew in your childhood and realizing they weren't really that tall...?

There's global warming all right, but don't let a few Indian summers fool you. :wink:

Just my opinion.

:-J

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Post by cockatootoo » Thu Oct 06, 2005 12:40 pm

Well I work outside (nigh onto thirty years now...) and I have to say this has got to be one of the hottest summers (now autumn) I can remember.
And very dry too.

I guess there would have to be a bunch in a row for it to be attributed to some climate shift - but it is wierd.

I have to agree with Jam about the nostalgic nature of past weather recollections - but I do believe there is starting to be just two seasons, summer and winter! There doesn't seem to be much moderation anymore.

Of course now the polar ice is supposedly melting... so let the theories begin :roll:

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al
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Post by al » Thu Oct 06, 2005 4:37 pm

Ah, well who knows?

In reality, I should hope for a warming trend because then my family in Florida won't have the opportunity to call me when it is cold here in Ohio and make fun of the weather!

Then again, I hope there is no warming because my 4-cylinder car just died and I got one with a dual overhead-cam, 24 valve V-6 mill and it moves out rather nicely I must say:-))))))) So I need cheap gasoline and plenty of it, thank you!!

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Post by al » Thu Oct 06, 2005 4:39 pm

...oh yes, Jakob, thanks for that translation from F to C! I was going to do that, but got too lazy to bother with it:-)

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Post by Froggy » Fri Oct 07, 2005 4:43 am

The polar ice caps are melting at a greater rate :(

I did notice that the last 2 years in the desert in CA it snowed, its normal up in the surrounding mountains (Arrowhead, Big Bear, Wrightwood etc) and they usually get some in Phelan(coming down from the mountains to the desert) but not usually in the desert itself, my daughter said they had about 2 feet of it in February. It seems as though the snow is coming later and not lasting as long. I remember when in UK they started taking bets at the bookies whether it would snow on Christmas day....I do remember a time when it was always snowing Christmas Day, Ive got Christmas photos to prove it but thats rare in UK now (so my mom said). Usually doenst start till about Jan/Feb.

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jam
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Post by jam » Fri Oct 07, 2005 7:28 am

Today at work I actually had my afternoon coffee OUTSIDE! It was (still is) clear sky and 18°C (~64°F), and we are talking early October in Scandinavia, how about that...

:-J

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Post by man who ate his car » Mon Jun 12, 2006 1:42 pm

In 2005, much of the United States experienced above average temperatures during the summer. The US has hot summers on average once about every 7-8 years or so. The southwest is hot every year, and in general if the northwest is cool, the midwest and northeast are hot. Conversely, if the midwest and northeast are cool, the northwest is hot. The weather in 2005 was nothing unusual, just another warmer than average cycle which occurs from time to time. During the last 25 years or so, average global temperatures have been on the rise which has resulted in warmer ocean waters and stormy weather in some regions. The 2005 hurricane season is one example. In general, the winters have become milder and the summers hotter. But the increase has not been extreme. Unless a radical change in climate takes place, this normal fluctuation in temperature will merely continue to be fodder for conversation. 2006 is shaping up to be a cooler summer than 2005. One event that can have a large negative impact on temperatures is volcano eruptions. A major eruption can have global impact, the volcanic ash and dust in the atmosphere blocks heat from the sun, causing the earth to cool noticeably. The summer of 1992 was unusually cool due to the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo.

And that boys and girls is your lesson in meteorology 101 today.
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al
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Post by al » Tue Jun 13, 2006 12:39 pm

man who ate his car wrote:And that boys and girls is your lesson in meteorology 101 today.


hmmm...level 101? And to think all the time I wasted in grad school where it seems I've gained nothing.


Tell that to the folks in Fairbanks, Alaska (Arctic Circle) today where it is 78 degrees F.

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Post by man who ate his car » Tue Jun 13, 2006 1:31 pm

Yep, when it is warm in Alaska and the northwest US it is generally cool in the central and northeast US, and vice versa. The southern half of the US gets hot summers annually, the northern half experiences hot summers on occasion. The great lakes region is slower to warm up in spring and early summer due to the breezes off chilly lake waters that keep areas near the lakes cooler. It takes water much longer to warm up than land does. The warmest lake temperatures usually occur in late summer and early fall. Lakes have a modifying affect on the weather. They keep nearby regions cooler in summer and milder in winter.
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al
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Post by al » Tue Jun 13, 2006 3:31 pm

Lee...Do you live in New Mexico? I've been through NM many times and every time I am impressed with the majestic beauty of that state.

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Post by man who ate his car » Wed Jun 14, 2006 7:31 am

No Al, I don't live in New Mexico, but I would like to. Either there or Arizona. Problem is, my girlfriend wants us to move north and I want to move south. I hope to eventually win this tug of war and we'll head south.
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al
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Post by al » Wed Jun 14, 2006 2:51 pm

I hope it works out for you. I think NM and AZ are the most amazing places I can imagine in terms of the beauty of the land, as well as the weather too, I suppose. I would like to move out that way, but my wife won't go for that. I have lived in Florida and in S. Calif. in my "single" days.

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Post by rito » Sun Jun 18, 2006 3:14 am

The situation is worse, than most people believe:
[url=http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/horizon/dimming_prog_summary.shtml]
Global Dimming[/url]

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